No-Strain Lemon Curd

pesach lemon curd ingredients

I love citrus!

I love lemons, limes, grapefruit, mandarines, oranges, pomelos and just about every citrus fruit that I can get my hands on.

Even when choosing a synthetic flavor, I opt for the citrus flavors. When I choose a dish detergent, air freshener, floor cleaner or gummy worm, I almost always opt for the citrus ones. There is something about the punch of the flavor, the smell of the zest and the tiny sacs of juiciness packed into a citrus fruit that is oh, so tantalizing.

And, Pesach (Passover) just goes with citrus.

We try to spend part of Pesach in the Galil (Galilee of Israel) and the fragrance of the citrus blossoms perfumes the air during this season.  The spring air with the sweet smell of citrus blossoms is Pesach’s gift to Israel.  And, in Israel, citrus fruits are called פרי הדר (literally glorious fruits), a real validation of my passion for citrus.

This Pesach, I was determined to prepare a simple and delicious lemon curd.  It uses simple ingredients and even calls for egg yolks, which abound on Pesach when egg whites seem to be on the list of so many Pesach baking recipes.  This recipe can be eaten on its own, spread on Matzo or fruit or can be combined with other ingredients to create mousses and sorbets.

I like the curd not too sweet and quite tart but you can easily adjust the amount of juice and honey to make the curd more or less sweet or lemony.  You can use any type of lemon, but I find that the Meyer lemons are in season now and are extra juicy.  This recipe can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator for several days.






6 tablespoons margarine, softened
1/2 cup honey
2 eggs + 2 egg yolks
3-4 Meyer lemons or 2/3 cup fresh lemon juice



Soften margarine in the microwave in ten-second increments, just until the margarine is soft to the touch but not runny.

In food processor fitted with the s-blade or in a blender, pulse margarine, honey, eggs and egg yolks until blended.  Using lemon squeezer, squeeze lemons and then add the lemon juice slowly into the blended mixture while the food processor / blender is running  The mixture may look curdled around the edges.  Taste the curd and add honey, if necessary and reblend.

pesach lemon curd in food processor

Pour the lemon curd into a pan and slowly cook over a medium flame, stirring occasionally until the mixture becomes smooth, but is not boiling.  Reduce the heat a bit and continue stirring until the lemon curd coats the back of a wooden spoon, about 10-15 minutes.

To store, pour the curd into a glass jar. To keep the curd from developing a skin, touch plastic wrap to the surface of the lemon curd.  Refrigerate until firm.


Passover Red Wine Chicken Marsala


pesach chicken marsala.JPG

This perfect for Pesach (Passover) recipe stars a red wine sauce and potato flour dredging for the chicken.   Although Marsala wine and flour are typically used in this recipe, I have adjusted the recipe to use red wine and Pesach gluten-free ingredients that pair so well with the flavors and themes of the Pesach seder experience.

Traditionally, we do not eat roasted meats at the seder, since the Karban Pesach (Passover sacrifice offering) was a roasted meat that was eaten at the time of the Holy Temple.  Since we no longer have the Holy Temple, it is customary not to eat roasted meat  on the evening of the seder.  This recipe is perfect for the seder.

We have a tradition of drinking four cups of wine at our Pesach (Passover) Seder.  After all, the majestic Seder venue commemorates our miraculous exodus from Egypt and the transformation of the Jewish nation from slavery to freedom.  What better drink than wine to celebrate freedom on a night replete with regal traditions?

We make a separate blessing on each of the four cups of wine at different parts of the seder.    The first cup of wine fills the role of kiddush (wine benediction) to sanctify the holiday of Pesach.   The second cup is associated with the lengthy telling of the story of the Exodus.  The third cup is associated with the Birkas Hamazon (Grace after Meals) and the fourth cup of wine is associated with the Hallel (songs of praise) that we sing toward the end of the seder.

Each of the four cups of wine symbolize one of the national exiles experienced by the Jewish nation and relate to one of the four expressions of redemption by G-d in the Exodus.

והוצאתי V’ho-tzaisi (and He took us out)
This expression of redemption symbolizes the Babylonian exile.

והצלתי  V’he-tzalti (and He saved us)
This expression of redemption symbolizes our oppression by Persia (further commemorated by Purim)

וגָּאלתי  V’ga-alti (and He redeemed us) This expression of redemption symbolizes our oppression by the Greeks (further commemorated by Chanukah)

ולקחתי  V’la-kachti (and He took us) This expression of redemption symbolizes the Roman exile.

This recipe tastes as good as the orginal and will wow your seder guests.  Enjoy!


2 pounds boneless chicken breasts, cut or pounded thin
1/3 cup potato starch
salt and pepper to taste
6 tablespoons olive oil
2 packages mushrooms, sliced or 2 large cans mushrooms, drained
Juice of half a lemon or 2 tablespoons lemon juice
3/4 cup red wine
1/4 cup pareve milk (optional)

parsley (optional, for garnish)


Place 1/3 cup of potato starch in a pie dish or a shallow bowl and season with salt and pepper.  Coat each piece of chicken with potato starch mixture.

Over medium-high heat, heat oil in a large frying pan or saute pan. Add the coated chicken. Cook each piece of coated chicken for 3-4 minutes on each side.  Work in batches, if necessary, making sure not to crowd the pan.

Slice mushrooms and cook for a few minutes in same pan, until mushrooms are soft and fragrant.

Add the wine and lemon juice, deglazing the pan with a wooden spoon by stirring in any brown bits left over from the cooking of the coated chicken.   Cook until the mushroom sauce is reduced to half.

Lower the heat to medium and add the pareve milk.  With a wooden spoon, stir well until the sauce is well-combined. Reduce heat to a simmer and simmer the sauce until the sauce is thick and glossy.

Return the cooked chicken to the pan and cook for 10-15 minutes more, until chicken is fragrant, soft, succulent and cooked through.

Add additional salt and pepper to taste, if necessary.  Optionally, garnish with chopped parsley.



pesach chicken marsala on a plate


Shabbos Table Tip: Napkins That Stand for Kiddush

standing napkins in table setting

A simple way to change up your Shabbos table setting is to play with the napkins.  For this Shabbos, I used a simple ivory, clear glass and silver color palate.  I folded the cloth napkins into fourths and then folded them accordion style.  I then stood them up in sturdy napkin rings.

napkins standing

Shabbat Shalom!



Pesach Onion Kugel

pesach onion kugel

I absolutely love a challenge!  In a comment on my Simply Amazing Onion Kugel, Pearl asked about adjusting this simple and delicious recipe to Pesach (Passover) cooking.  I worked on making this recipe suitable for Pesach and my family contends that this recipe is even better than the original.

I agree.

Our custom on Pesach is not to bruck (use matzo products with liquid), so it was not possible to merely substitute soaked matzo for the soaked bread in the original recipe.  I played with the recipe until I came up with this Pesach variation.

We all licked our plates clean.  It is a winner and it will be on our seder menu this year.

Have a Chag Kasher V’Samaech (Happy and Kosher Passover)!


food processor
pyrex pie plate



4-5 onions

3 eggs
2/3 cup potato starch
1/4 cup oil
1/3 cup seltzer
1 teaspoon salt
pinch black pepper



Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Coat a pyrex pie plate lightly with oil and place in oven.

While the oil is heating up, cut the onions into large chunks. Using the metal s-blade of the food processor, pulse the onions until they are shredded but not liquidy.  Add eggs, oil, seltzer,  salt and pepper. Pulse a few times to combine.

Carefully remove the sizzling pyrex pie plate from the oven. Pour the mixture directly from the food processor bowl into the pyrex pie plate and bake uncovered for one hour and ten minutes. When done, the onion kugel should be caramelized on top and bottom and soft and creamy on the inside.



Because sulphuric gas released from the onion during cutting reacts with tear ducts, eyes feel irritated and release tears when cutting onions.  Heating the onion before cutting  breaks apart the enzymes that emit sulphuric gas to reduce and/or eliminate the tears.   The easiest way to heat the onions for this kugel is to microwave them on high for several minutes  in 30 second increments.  For best results, cool the microwaved onions before cutting into chunks.

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Lemon Poppy Dressing

lemon poppy dressing

Salad dressings are basically comprised of the same three elements: oil, acid and flavor.  Some use olive oil for a distinctive oil taste.  Others use mayonnaise for  a creamy texture.  There are dressings that use citrus for its acid component and others that use wine or balsamic vinegar for its characteristic acidic kick.

This dressing adds another dimension to these elements that makes it delicious and oh, so memorable.  Poppy seeds add color to this dressing, but more importantly, they add a pop-in-your-mouth texture that is unforgettable.

I prepared this lemon poppy dressing last week for the salad bar at our Purim seuda.  I have used it to add flavor and pizzazz to so much else since.  I have drizzled some on grilled chicken, salads and baked salmon.

It is simple.  It is delicious.  It is beautiful.  And, it is so versatile.



Cuisinart food processor

set of 16 oz wide-mouth squirt bottles


1/2 cup lemon juice or juice of 4 lemons
1 tablespoon mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons mayonaaise
1 tablespoon poppy seeds

1/2 cup oil


Using an s-blade in the food processor, combine all ingredients, saving oil for last. With machine running, slowly drizzle in oil and process until combined and smooth. Carefully decant into squeeze bottle.


Please Note: This post contains affiliate links from Amazon, which means I earn a small commission if you click and make a purchase.

Simple Cranberry Sorbet

cranberry sorbet

I’ll share a secret with you.

My Purim seuda (feast) menu is designed around the chametz (leavened products) that I must use up before Pesach (Passover).

This year, I found myself with lots of frozen challah, hence the stuffed chicken breasts and meatballs.  I found that I had three bags of fine egg noodles, and thus yerushalmi kugel was added to the menu. I found myself with way too many boxes of brownie mix, even after giving so many boxes away to the fastest respondents on our Cousins WhatsApp chat.  I created stunning pecan truffle cookies and made delicious Strawberry and Brownie Mini Trifles to use up the remaining boxes of brownie mix.

As I was sorting through the freezer, I found a few bags of frozen cranberries.  According to halacha (Jewish law),  cranberries are not chametz.  Therefore, they did not need to be consumed or discarded before Pesach, but after doing the math, I realized that they probably were already several months old.  After all, I usually buy fresh cranberries around Thanksgiving and then wash and freeze them in late November or early December.

I set a handful of cranberries aside to prepare Frosted Sugar-Coated Cranberries to be used as a garnish, but decided to prepare cranberry sorbet with the rest of the frozen cranberries.  I remember seeing a Cranberry Ice recipe posted by one of my favorite kosher bloggers, CookingfortheTimeChallenged and I used that as my inspiration for this recipe.

This recipe uses sweet soda or juice as the liquid base.  I found some flat soda left over from a Sheva Brochos that I recently hosted.  This is the perfect recipe to use up that leftover grape juice, orange juice or flat soda.

I love the sweet and savory flavor combination.  I garnished these ices with chives for a surprising bite, but other herbs like mint or basil may be blended right in for that stunning palate sensation.


one can cranberry sauce, whole or jellied
1 cup soda or juice
1 bag frozen berries or 2 cups frozen grapes

herb garnish, such as basil, mint or chives (optional)


Using the s-blade of the food processor, puree cranberry sauce, berries and liquid.

Freeze until solid or overnight.

Once frozen, remove from freezer and defrost just enough to scoop back into the food processor fitted with the s-blade.

Pulse sorbet in food processor just until smooth.  Refreeze.

To allow for simple entertaining, I usually defrost for 20-30 minutes before scooping.

Garnish with mint leaves and Frosted Sugar-Coated Cranberries


Any canned fruit may be substituted for the canned cranberry sauce.

Any frozen fruit may be substituted for the frozen berries.  Just make sure to taste puree and blend with enough soda or juice for optimal sweetness.  Honey may be added as well to sweeten the sorbet.

Blend your choice of fresh herbs like mint, basil or chives for that unusual sweet and savory flavor sensation.


I scoop the sorbet into small cups in advance and freeze in the cups until ready to serve. That speeds up the serving of a frozen dessert and keeps everything tidy.    I add the garnish at the end so that the leaves stay fresh and green.

Simplest Mushroom Barley Soup

mushroom barley soup.png

I have been thinking about the menu for my upcoming Purim seuda (feast).  Admittedly, I check my pantry for chometz (leavened products unsuitable for Passover) before Purim and many of my seuda recipes are designed to use those products.   It helps me use up those products that I will need to discard, donate or finish before Pesach (Passover).

One of those chometz products is barley.  I use it in the cholent, but not for much else.  And, I had two bags in my pantry, much more than I could use in the next few weeks.  So,  barley came out of my pantry and created this delicious and oh, so simple mushroom-barley soup.

This crockpot soup uses a few simple wholesome ingredients  tossed right into the crockpot.  There is  no sauteing in advance.  Just put it up in the morning and come home to a delicious, hearty and flavorful soup in the evening.  The barley creates a starchy texture that contrasts so well with the smooth earthiness of the mushrooms.  The onions and celery round out the soup so perfectly.

And, you will have less barley to contend with before Pesach.

2 packages mushrooms, sliced (try baby bella)
6 stalks celery, sliced
1 onion, diced
3/4 cup barley
1 tablespoon salt
dash of pepper

6 quart crockpot

Toss mushrooms, celery, onion barley, salt and pepper into the crockpot and stir. Fill crockpot two-thirds to the top with water. Cook on high from morning to evening, at least six hours.

For an even easier preparation, substitute 2 large cans mushrooms for the fresh mushrooms.


For a deeper flavor, substitute vegetable or chicken stock for some of the water.

This soup freezes extremely well. Cool soup and decant into freezer-safe containers or freezer-type zipper bags. Just defrost and reheat. Add fresh herbs and water if necessary to freshen it up.

Please Note: This post contains affiliate links from Amazon, which means I earn a small commission if you click and make a purchase.

Shabbos Table: Mix It Up!

This Shabbos, Avigail and Judah will be visiting unexpectedly as Kaitlyn has the flu.  We always love these type of surprises and this is the perfect opportunity to blend disposable and real dishes on the Shabbos table.   Judah still looks forward to his two forks on Shabbos and he will have two spoons, too.  Just to keep Avigail happy, we will skip the knives for the kids.

As you can see, I took the “mixing it up” concept to a whole new level.  Rose gold (Walmart!) disposable dishes blend with white table accents.  An embroidered vintage tablecloth blends with white and rose gold paper napkins.  A contemporary hammered copper-tone ice bucket blends with an antique silver creamer.

Shabbat Shalom!

shabbos table- mix it up.jpg

A Simple Chicken Soup Upgrade

upgraded chicken soup with rutabaga.jpg

I’ve been serving the same basic chicken soup recipe for more than thirty years. My family, even the “vegetarians” among them, look forward to chicken soup at the Friday night Shabbos dinner, rain or shine, winter or summer.

As far as changes over the years, they have been minimal.  I sometimes leave the vegetables whole and sometimes dice the vegetables.  When Kaitlyn visits, I add an extra onion and eliminate the celery.  When Michelle visits, I add extra zucchini.   Leah loves eating the dill sprigs that I remove from the soup before serving.   Aaron and Davida put no extra demands on the chicken soup and they enjoy the soup any way that it is served.

This winter I upgraded the chicken soup.  I added cubes of waxed turnip, also known as rutabaga.

I didn’t think that it was a big deal, until the first time I served the upgraded soup.

“What did you do differently to the soup?” asked Leah.  “Yeah” chimed in the rest of the family.

I braced myself.  After all, upgrading a thirty-year constant can be a big deal.

I need not have worried because they all loved the assertive flavor and color of the diced rutabaga.  It was just another distinctive character in the colorful combination of textures and flavors of my chicken soup.

And, that is perfectly fine.  The chicken soup is kind of like our family, our Shabbos table and our lives, a colorful blend of personalities.


One pound of boneless, skinless chicken breast trimmings
1 white turnip, peeled and cubed
1 waxed turnip (rutabaga), well-peeled and cubed
1 parsnip, peeled and sliced
3-4 carrots, peeled and sliced
4 stalks celery (optional), scrubbed and cut into 1 inch sections
2 small onions (optional), peeled and left whole
2 tablespoons salt (more or less for taste)
1 teaspoon pepper
1-2 sprigs dill (optional)
2 zucchini, scrubbed and cut into 1 inch sections


Peel and prepare vegetables. The rutabaga has a thick waxed coating, so peel carefully with a peeler or a paring knife, taking care to remove every bit of peel.



Place chicken and vegetables (except zucchini) in a large stock pot and fill 2/3 to the top with water. Bring soup to a rolling boil and then lower heat to medium and cook for one more hour.

Replace any water that has evaporated, making sure that the level of the soup broth is where it started before cooking. Add zucchini and increase flame to high.  Boil for 15-20 more minutes.

upgraded chicken soup with rutabaga


Shabbos Table Tip: When Desperate Times Call for Disposable-Mix it Up!

Last Friday night, we hosted an oneg (lit. delight, Shabbos get-together) at our home for Davida’s friends from her seminary alma-mater,  Midreshset Mevaseret Yerushalayim (MMY).  Logistically, this means that we enjoyed our own Shabbos dinner meal before and during inviting dozens of MMY-ers into our home for a night of learning, food and Shabbos delight.  This is one of those desperate times that calls for disposable dishes.

And, if we must use disposable dishes on Shabbos, we will rock it!  It is not often that I succumb to using disposable dishes, especially on Shabbos.  So, when I do, I try to mix the disposables with regular cutlery and glassware and add a non-disposable tablecloth, napkins and napkin rings to the table settings.

Shabbat Shalom!

shabbos table cwith disposables 1.jpg


No-Chop No-Fuss Spinach Split Pea Soup

split pea spinach soup

On these wintry days, there is nothing like a hot bowl of soup.

This soup takes the bowl! It uses a few simple wholesome ingredients with no chopping and no mess.  Just take a few minutes to toss all the ingredients in the crockpot in the morning and come home to a finished delicious soup in the evening.  The pot does all the work, no dicing. no sauteing, no prep mess.

one 16 ounce bag (2 cups) of yellow split peas
one bag of fresh or frozen baby spinach (see kosher notes)
one tablespoon salt
dash of pepper


6 quart crockpot


Fill crockpot two-thirds to the top with water. Toss split peas, spinach, salt and pepper into the crockpot and stir. Cook on high from morning to evening, at least six hours.

Kosher laws disallow the eating of any whole insects and therefore most greens require a process of soaking, rinsing and in some cases, pureeing. I have found that flat-leafed greens like baby spinach are much easier to check for insects than their curly-leaf counterparts. Kashrut authorities differ on the proper checking of leafy vegetables and some disallow the use of spinach altogether. This blog was not designed to be your kosher authority, so please consult your local rabbinic authority regarding using leafy greens such as spinach.

This soup freezes extremely well. Cool soup and decant into freezer-safe containers or freezer-type zipper bags. Just defrost and reheat. Add fresh herbs and water if necessary to freshen it up.


Please Note: This post contains affiliate links from Amazon, which means I earn a small commission if you click and make a purchase.

Streuseled Cranberry Pie

This recipe gets an A for versatility and simplicity.  It uses simple ingredients and can be used as a side dish or as a dessert.  It can be served cold, room temperature or hot.  It can be a delicious accompaniment to grilled chicken and can be served as a side dish right in its pie plate.  Or, it can be scooped out onto plates or ramekins and served with a scoop of ice cream.

The original recipe made its rounds when I was first married and living in Pittsburgh.  I recall that it used margarine, canned pineapple and had loads of sugar.  I have adapted it to eliminate the margarine, use some fresh fruit and I have reduced the amount of sugar in the streusel topping.  It is now better than ever!

1 can cranberry sauce, whole or jellied variety
1/2 cup fresh or frozen cranberries (optional)
1/2 cup fresh or frozen fruit, diced

1/2 cup uncooked oatmeal
1/4 cup sugar
6-8 tablespoons oil
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger (optional)

cranberry streusel

Decant cranberry sauce into Pyrex pie plate and mash with a fork or masher until flat, covering the entire bottom of the pie plate. Add fresh/frozen cranberries and fruit and mix slightly with the canned cranberry.

In a bowl or in a food processor with the s-blade attached, combine oatmeal, sugar, oil, cinnamon, and ginger.  Sprinkle on top of the cranberry mixture.

Bake at 375 degrees F for 30-40 minutes. Streusel should be golden brown on top when done.

Set It and Forget It Lentil-Vegetable Soup

There is something so hearty and comforting about lentil soup.  And, there is something about taking just a few minutes to prepare a soup on these cold, snowy mornings and coming back at the end of the day to a warm, thick, velvety and delicious soup.  Ordinary lentils really have that magical texture, firm yet creamy.  Adding vegetables to the ingredient list just takes lentil soup to a whole new level.

For this soup, I used the most common brown lentil .  It has the seed hull intact and is most suitable for salads and soups that require the lentil to retain its shape.   If you are short on time, you can use red lentils, instead.   It will cut down on the cooking time and still yield a hearty and delicious soup with a less defined texture to the lentil base.

set it and forget it lentil soup in crock

one bag lentils
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
dash of pepper
3-4 garlic cloves, minced or 1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 parsnip, cut into thin slices
1 package mushrooms, sliced thin
4 stalks celery, sliced thin
1 onion, diced
1 zucchini, diced

celery leaves, for garnish (optional)

set it and forget it lentil soup.jpg


Place lentils, vegetables and seasonings into a crockpot. Fill crockpot 3/4 to top with water. Cook on high from morning to evening. If the soup is too thick, add up to a cup of water and stir well. Garnish with celery leaves right before serving.

When in a hurry, I substitute red lentils and adjust the cooking time to 4 hours.  Right before serving, puree soup with a  stick blender for a creamy texture.

Shabbos Table Tip: A Creamer to Distribute Kiddush Wine

On Friday night and Shabbos morning, our  Shabbos meals begin with the recitation of Kiddush (blessing over wine) by the patriarch of the family.  The word Kiddush actually means holiness as we recall G-d’s creation of the world and His dedication of the Shabbos as a day of rest and holiness.   We designate a special cup for the Kiddush, typically a silver one.   At our Shabbos table, you will also see one or two silver creamers placed alongside the kiddush cup.

After the Kiddush is recited over the goblet of wine or grape juice, everyone at the table answers אָמֵן, Amen.  The kiddush wine is then silently passed to each person at the table as the one who made the kiddush drinks from the original goblet.  Typically, the wine is poured from the kiddush cup into small shot glasses or miniature kiddush cups and then passed around.  To simplify things (and require less washing and clean-up afterward), instead, we place a decorative creamer next to the silver wine goblet.  This shortcut was an elegant solution thought up by our friend, Michael Horn, to the challenge of passing the kiddush wine around the table quickly and easily with minimal spillage.

Just after reciting the kiddush, Don pours off some of the wine before drinking from the silver kiddush cup into the creamer.  The creamer is then passed around the table and each person pours a bit of wine into his/her glass.  When we have a houseful of guests, I place two creamers, one for each side of the table, in order to expedite passing the wine around the table.

Shabbat Shalom!



Roasted Confetti Vegetables with Cashews

This is the perfect side dish for a weeknight.   It uses wholesome ingredients, takes minutes to prepare and requires only 20 minutes to roast. The meatiness of the cashews paired with the tender shreds of zucchini and rainbow carrots make this dish hearty, flavorful and satisfying.

confetti roasted vegetables.jpg


1-2 zucchini, shredded
1 package rainbow carrots, peeled and shredded
1 onion, shredded
handful of whole cashews

2 teaspoons kosher salt
flavored oil or olive oil


Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.  Using the shredding blade of the food processor, shred onion, carrots and zucchini.

Spread vegetables atop the lined baking sheet. Drizzle with a scant amount of oil and sprinkle with salt. Sprinkle a handful of cashews over vegetables.

Roast for 15-20 minutes.

Toss and enjoy!

Pistachio Encrusted Cajun Tilapia

pistachio-encrusted tilapia-ready to cook

My two sisters-in-law, Yael and Chaya, share the same birthday.  Interestingly, it was the same birthday shared by my father-in-law a’H, too.  Last year, we went out for a woman’s-only dinner in celebration of the birthdays.   We enjoyed our time together so much that this year, in the ice and snow,  we once again trekked to a dairy restaurant in Brooklyn to celebrate the two birthdays.

My sisters-in-law ordered menu items that they knew and trusted: salmon, salad and Eggplant Parmesan.  Always looking for something new, I was entranced by the pistachio-encrusted salmon on the menu and was not disappointed when it was presented and devoured by me and my sisters-in-law.

So, I started thinking… Salmon is so flavorful and distinctive on its own.   Why don’t I try this encrusting technique on a blander fish like tilapia?  Tilapia is one of  those inexpensive fish ingredients that is always available at my local fish counter.  Its meaty flesh and mild taste make it suitable for kick-start cajun seasoning and nutty pistachio encrusting.

And so, for dinner the night after the birthday celebration, I prepared this dish.  And, both Don and Leah confirmed that it was blog-worthy.  Here it is!

4 large tilapia filets
2 tablespoons Cajun seasoning
1 egg
1/2 cup chopped pistachios

oil or cooking spray

1/3 cup Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon wine vinegar
2 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons honey

food processor
pyrex pie plate

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Place cajun seasoning on a plate or pyrex pie plate.  Blend egg with fork in a separate plate or pyrex pie plate.   Place chopped pistachios on a third plate or pyrex pie plate.

pistachio-encrusted tilapia-prep plates

Lightly coat both sides of tilapia with Cajun seasoning and then dip into egg, coating both sides. Finally, coat each tilapia fillet with chopped pistachios.

Cover a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.  If using foil, drizzle with a bit of oil or spray with cooking spray.  Place the encrusted tilapia fillets in a single layer, making sure not to crowd the dish.

pistachio-encrusted tilapia-ready to cook

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until the tilapia easily flakes with a fork.

In a food processor or with a whisk in a bowl, combine honey Dijon ingredients until smooth and creamy.

honey dijon sauce.jpg

Drizzle over fish before serving.

pistachio-encrusted tilapia-serving suggestion.jpg


Please Note: This post contains affiliate links from Amazon, which means I earn a small commission if you click and make a purchase.

Shabbos Table Setting: Using Napkins as the Star

Thank you, Alyssa and Sara!

Last week, Alyssa suggested that I post a picture of my Shabbos table.  I received great positive feedback on this post from friends who have been at our Shabbos table, so I will try and post a picture weekly.  To maintain the theme of this blog, with each picture, I will try to highlight something that my readers can adapt to their own Shabbos table.

This week, I will suggest using gorgeous napkin rings as the star of the table setting.  Sara and Alyssa, who recently visited with Davida, brought us a gift of gorgeous new napkin rings that I am using for the first time this Shabbos.   These gold leather napkin rings are embossed with the Hebrew words Shabbos Kodesh (holy Shabbos).  I chose to use the napkin rings with white cloth napkins, folded into a quarter square and then accordion folded.  I fanned them out on top and bottom, above and beneath the napkin ring cinch.

shabbos table 1-19-2018.jpg

This Shabbos, my grandchildren, Avigail and Yehudah, are visiting.  Yehudah has told his parents that he loves to visit Bobby (that’s, me!)  because I give him two forks.  I not only offer the grandchildren two forks at our Shabbos table, but I even offer them the same silver and dishes as everyone else.  I do eliminate the glass stemware and knives for kids, until they are ready.  The napkins and rings equalize all the differences in the table settings between the adults and the children and really add a touch of elegance.

Shabbat Shalom  (peaceful Shabbos)!

Simply Magical London Broil

There are some dishes that need garnishing and extra sauces once cooked.  This is not one of them.   This London Broil roast is ready to serve and self-garnished with baked onions and scallions.  It is simple enough for a weekday dinner and “wow” enough for Shabbos or that special celebration.  It uses the simplest of ingredients, technique and presentation and yet, it is delicious, succulent and beautiful.

Magical baked london broil with Celery on cutting board.png

1 small (2-3 pound) London Broil
1 red onion, diced small
1-2 bunches scallions, cut small
handful of french fried onions (optional)
juice of one lemon or lime
4 stalks celery
1/3 cup water


Let London Broil come to room temperature.

Slice celery into thick chunks.

In a roasting pan or pyrex dish, place celery chunks and then place London Broil fattier side up.  Squeeze citrus on both sides of London broil and season with salt and pepper.

Pour 1/3 cup of water around London Broil and then top London Broil with diced onion and scallions.

Magical baked london broil with Celery-raw.png

Cover pan tightly with foil.

Bake at 300 degrees F for 3 hours. London Broil should be fork tender when done.   Allow meat to rest for at least 10 minutes before slicing on the bias.

Magical baked london broil with Celery.png

Red Velvet Salmon


cranberry salmon

I decided to name this salmon recipe red velvet for the color and texture of the cranberry glaze.   There really is something velvety about  this simple salmon recipe that takes cranberry sauce to a whole new level.

Cranberries are a fall and winter specialty item and I still have so many bags of cranberries in my freezer from Thanksgiving.  Every time I open my freezer, I think of cranberry and the many delicious ways to use this tart and distinctive berry.

So, when I was planning a new salmon dish, I thought to use cranberries as the centerpiece.   This recipe can be made with homemade cranberry sauce and that way you can adjust the sweetness of the glaze.  But, to keep things simple, I prepared with salmon recipe with store-bought cranberry sauce.  I used the jellied variety, but the whole berry variety will work just as well.



salmon fillet

3-4 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 cup canned cranberry sauce
2 tablespoons fresh lemon or lime juice
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon ginger powder

garnishes (optional)
1/2 cup fresh cranberries
Celery Curls

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

In a small bowl whisk together the glaze ingredients, smoothing out the lumps in the cranberry sauce as much as possible.

Place the salmon on a baking sheet coated with foil or parchment.  Pat the marinade into the salmon.

Bake for 30-40 minutes.

Garnish with fresh cranberries and celery curls before serving.


15 Minute Mushroom Soup

mushroom soup

The weather outside is frightfully cold and nothing warms the soul like a hot bowl of satisfying soup.   Although yesterday morning, I intended to start my  Crockpot Drunken Mushroom Soup in the crockpot,  I never did.  Instead, I got home late with only 15 minutes to get dinner on the table.   That meant that I needed to make the soup in a heavy-bottom pot using every shortcut possible.

I skimped on sauteing the onions and celery slowly and carefully.  Instead, I cut the onions and celery very small and started the soup by just sauteing the small bits of onions and celery for a few minutes.  I then shredded the mushrooms and zucchini in the food processor so that the tiny bits would cook quickly.  I skipped the wine and just added salt and pepper for flavor.

This soup was one of the best that I ever produced.  Sorry, kids!  Although my kids often chastise me for complimenting my own food, I subscribe to the belief that a cook may compliment or criticize their own handiwork.  Why not?

The soup was so flavorful and so silky that Don could not believe that there was no cream in this soup.  He loved this soup so much that he enjoyed three bowls of it.  So, guys, I didn’t even need to compliment my own soup.  Dad did it for me in word and in deed.  Indeed!



2-3 tablespoons oil
1 onion, diced small
3 stalks celery, diced small
2 containers mushrooms, shredded
2-3 medium zucchini,shredded
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
dash pepper
4-6 cups of water

Celery Garnish (optional)


In a heavy bottom pot over medium-high heat, saute onion and celery in oil for just a few minutes, until onions and celery are soft but not brown.

While vegetables are sauteing, shred the mushrooms and zucchini in the food processor using the s-blade or the shredding blade.

Add the shredded mushrooms and zucchini to the onions and celery. Add the salt and pepper and stir to combine. Add water and bring to a boil.  Simmer for a few minutes more until the soup is cooked through and silky.

Garnish with a celery curl.




To speed up recipes, cut, shred or dice ingredients into smaller pieces.   Smaller bits create more surface area for the heat and cooking media to enter.  Just take care, because the smaller the pieces of ingredients, the easier these ingredients are to overcook or to burn.

Tulips Times Two


On these frigid winter days, it is so exciting to see tulips for sale at the local market. Tulips, a member of the lily family,  are a welcome harbinger of spring and it keeps hope alive for warmer weather ahead.

Tulips come in thousands of varieties and can be found in all colors, shapes and heights.  Their leaves are soft and large, sometimes as long as the tulip stem itself.

I especially love tulips that have variegated colors and interesting petal shapes.  These pink tulips were for sale at my local supermarket and boasted green edges, light green leaves and soft blossoms.

This arrangement uses both the tulip blossoms and their leaves.  My tulip bunch was comprised of ten blossoms and my narrow vase fit two five-blossom bunches with enough space left over for effect.

This type of arrangements creates interest both at the top of the vase where the blossoms are arranged and inside the vase where each bunch is wrapped in a tulip leaf.   It is best suited for a long and narrow glass vase.  This can easily be done with one, two or three bunches of tulips, as long as your vase is wide enough.

long glass vase
bunch of tulips
piece of wire or small rubber band

Trim tulips so that they are just a few inches taller than your vase.  Separate tulips into groups of at least 4 tulips each, trying to keep tulip bunches symmetric.  Remove lower tulip leaves and reserve an unblemished leaf for wrapping each bunch.  Wrap the leaf around each bunch, securing with thin wire or rubber band.

Display in long glass vase and fill with water.


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Belgian Waffles for a Crowd

waffles for a crowd-a la mode.jpg


This week, we hosted two Sheva Brochos  parties at our home.  Since Thursday night’s Sheva Brochos came out right at the conclusion of the fast of Asara Be’Teves, we decided to plan a dairy menu.

For this Sheva Brochos party, we had a wonderful group of hosts.  Each of the hosts prepared delicious food and we had quite a spectacular array of breads, soups, salads, pasta, vegetables and fish.  We had beautiful Divrei Torah (words of Torah) and creative and fun games planned and executed by our friends, Shira and Wendy.

For dessert, we had delicious cheesecake, brownies, apple pie a la mode and so many other delicious dairy delights.  Since it was a cold night, Davida convinced me to prepare waffle batter in advance  and to set up a waffle station for our guests.  I made three batches of our favorite waffle recipe and stored them in mason jars.  I set up the waffle maker, the waffle batter, a small measuring cup, cooking spray and an assortment of toppings.

It was simple to wow our guests with these delicious and fun waffles!

Hearty and Simple Udon Soup

udon soup.jpg

Udon soup is our new family fave.  It has all the penicillin-qualities of a hearty chicken soup and oh, so much more! It is a soup that can easily be transformed into an entire meal and is so satisfying and comforting on these cold winter evenings.

This Udon soup starts from scratch but it can also easily be made using leftover Shabbos chicken soup or store-bought chicken broth.   It is the combination of textures, flavors and colors that gives this soup its memorable qualities.

There is something in this soup for everyone. Some like to wrap their fork around the long, thick and hearty Udon noodles, some pick out the green vegetables and other just savor the Asian-inspired broth for its unique flavor.

8 cups chicken stock

1 cup shredded cooked chicken (optional)

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger or ginger powder
2 cloves minced fresh garlic or 1 tablespoon garlic powder
2-3 tablespoons soy sauce
2-3 tablespoons sesame oil

1 package sliced fresh mushrooms
1 zucchini, peeled and sliced

1 bunch of baby bok choy, sliced (see kosher notes)

1/2 cup whole snow peas
1 cup green onions diced

package of fresh Udon noodles

Add ginger, garlic, soy sauce  and sesame oil to chicken stock.  Bring to a boil and then add mushrooms,  zucchini and bok choy.  Reduce heat to medium and heat for at least 10 minutes.
Add the Udon noodles and cook according to package directions.  Add green onions and snow peas right before serving to maintain bright green color.


Kosher laws disallow the eating of any whole insects and therefore greens like bok choy require a process of soaking and rinsing and checking. Kashrut authorities differ on the proper checking of these type of greens and some disallow its use altogether. This blog was not designed to be your kosher authority, so please consult your local rabbinic authority regarding using and preparing bok choy.


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